Tag Archives: personal training

My Attitude to Running has Changed.

In the last few weeks I have had a rush of enquires from ladies wanting to know where I stand on running.

As my attitude toward running during a pregnancy has changed quite dramatically since my pregnancy in 2010. I thought it might be something worth sharing.

Back then all I had was a pre/post natal course under my belt and not much else. My personal training experience with pregnant/post natal clients was limited and with no first hand experience, I started a blog and wrote down my training and how I felt. Initially spurred on because the course I had attended was centered around very gentle modes of training and as a crossfitter that just was not going to cut the mustard.

There was little information I could find at that point regarding CrossFit training during pregnancy so I lent on a commonly used expression frequently used when discussing pregnancy training “to listen to your body”. I took this quite literally. Running for me was not a problem even at 8 months! I felt fine, in fact better then fine. I even did a 5k race for life!

Following the delivery of my son and getting to grips with a new born I was quite keen to get back to training as quickly as possible. 6 wks after a c section I was fitting in short runs. Even as I write this I am shaking my head thinking how silly I was! But then I did not have much first hand experience to reflect upon. I was not really considering how running and other certain elements of training had impacted my pregnant body.

The long and short of it now, is that I believe unless we run professionally, running should be limited and at best avoided completely.

The pelvic area although strong enough to bare the load of a pregnancy, is not capable of absorbing the added impact of running without any consequences. Some of which have profound effects on our quality of life.

That does not mean training needs to be soft, fluffy and gentle. Training needs to be smarter! As for subbing running in your routine, try for example heavy farmers carries. They are not at all the easy option and provides a great sub during most CrossFit wods that include a run. Cycling, maybe not on the roads but in a park or common still gets the wind through your hair the same as a run would.

I still have not explained why my attitude has changed?
The short answer, experience and education!

After Sebastian’s arrival I studied with Jenny Burrell, a leading women’s health teacher. Jenny’s field of speciality is looking at factors that negatively impact pelvic floor health during the life of a women, from pregnancy to menopause.

We discussed running at length and shared my experience which was positive, so I thought. During her teachings She had me understand how good the body is at compensating during a pregnancy. How quickly bodies adapt and cope.

The fact that I felt fine running was just my body coping and because I did not notice any discomfort in that moment, I continued running.

Since having Sebastian I have been plagued with knee and ankle issues that I did not have before. I have blamed everything from squatting frequency to lack of stretching but honestly none of that is any different to before I had my son. I now lay the blame at my slap-dash attitude to training during my pregnancy! Jumping on a box, running 400m as many times as possible probably wasn’t the smartest move, regardless of how I felt. I could have scaled to a step up or a farmers carry and had just as good a workout.

How does running and jumping cause these problems?
The pelvis is a pretty intricate piece of kit. There are numerous small attachments and insertions of muscles and ligaments.
Pregnancy see these muscles and ligaments strain under the pressure of a growing uterus. They are already under stress.

The more we run/jump the greater stress they take on board. Imagine accumulating 9months of this added strain, then not forgetting to consider hormones that make our joints and muscles more supple during pregnancy and conditions become perfect for unwanted damage to start building up.

Consequences of this build up could be anything from aches and pains, weakness in areas that previously felt fine. Pain during intercourse or continence issues. Weight gain trouble. If we only notice the damage some time after pregnancy we often do not even relate this back to what we did in our pregnancy.

1# Training Tip for an awesome recovery;
Avoid running, ditch the plyometric workouts, lose the skipping rope, pay attention to recovery and do not rush the process!!!

Consider the Postnatal period as 12 months from when you have your baby. A 12 month outlook is a realistic approach to fixing all the stress pregnancy and a new born involves. Start from the core centre (your tummy) and work toward the extremities in a logical and progressive way.

For further personal training, advise and guidance you can reach me @ sally@crossfitlondonuk.com

The All Important Quality Workout

Quality work outs should be executed with scaling and technique in mind. Although technique is crucial throughout all training sessions, it is an easy thing to let slip, in the mist of a ‘for time’ wod where you are chasing other people around you.

Quality workouts dismiss the need for blistering speed in favour of staying well clear of failed grinding reps that ultimately regress our form and hold us back.

Ensuring your training routine regularly includes a dose of specific quality sessions will up your game during those all important ‘For time’ wods.

This is my quality wod for the day. It is in two parts. The first four rounds are going to challenge structural balance and core. Part two works those all important body weight moves that us women tend to find our weak link. Ensure while setting up you select appropriate scales that enable you to work at a level that challenges but keeps form in tack.  Enjoy!

4 Rounds For Quality;

10 Walking Lunges

10 Jumping Lunges

10 Reverse Weighted Lunges

10 Bulgarian Split Lunges

10 Burpee Jumping Lunges

Rest as needed (I tend it rest long enough to set up the next components)

4 Rounds For Quality

10 Incline Push ups

10 Ring Rows

10 Ring Dips (Scale with feet on floor)

10 Pike Push ups

 

 

Back to Business

Welcoming in the warmer weather means we begin to think of spring cleaning and new starts following the long winter months.  For me this feels like the perfect timing for me  to resurrect my blog and maybe explain my extended absence.

It has been a while since I have been able to regularly post my thoughts and ideas on pregnancy training & CrossFit.

I have had a very good excuse.

I have been studying.

Developing my coaching skills by completing a DTLLS award.  This is a teaching qualification which allows me to teach post 14 years old. I can add supply teaching assistant/learning support to my list of experience, having placements in a variety of inner London primary and secondary schools.

I have also moved to the South East of London!  Quite a lot to juggle, hence the back burner for sallydixey.com

Moving means I am now only coaching at CrossFit London on Saturday mornings. This limits my availability for personal training in East London. Appointments are by arrangement via email only. Reach me at; sally@crossfitlondonuk.com

This does however mean exciting times ahead.

My relocation to South East is a brand new chapter but also brings me full circle and back to my roots.  I started as a fitness instructor this side of the water at GLL Waterfront Leisure Centre.

South East is almost untouched as far as the CrossFit movement is concerned. This is something I hope to change.

So look forward to hearing a lot more from me over the coming months and the big reveal  when I finally have the finishing touches completed to my garage gym at my South East London location just off Shooters Hill.

A Brief History of Pregnancy

An article idea was given to me by a Facebook friend -The Changing Face of Pregnancy and Exercise.

Great idea, I thought what might make this even more interesting is a look back over history at what shaped the way we looked at pregnancy.

Ancient Times sounds like a very idyllic time to have a baby.

People were spiritual believing birth and death were like the sun and moon. Cycles of life.

Faith was put in women to carry and deliver children without male interference and almost entirely delivered in an upright position. Women continued with their day to day tasks until the baby was born. (The only exception to this rule is Greek and Romans, who had a distrust for women)

Labour pains were considered as a reaction to the baby fighting his way out of the womb. Death rate in delivery was very low.

Medieval Times to 17th Century is where things start to get a bit ugly.

Attitudes were starting to change as conflict erupted between the church and ancient traditions.

Labour pains became punishment for Eve’s sins.

There was little to no sanitation. Rooms were made dark and warm with straw scattered on the floor to absorb any fluids.

C Sections were performed during this time but on dead mothers.

Women were encouraged to spend the last few weeks of pregnancy in bed resting.

During these times it seems that a little more intervention started to take place and delivery became far less serene.   Death rate were still relatively low but certainly creeping up.

The next era to make there mark was the 18th century and the beginning of science.

The forceps were introduced in 1740! No antiseptic though!

Intervention was far more aggressive and common place and is when delivery started to make it’s way into hospitals (though upper classes thought this was very common and continued to have home births)

Living conditions were poor at this time, hygiene was still a long way off.

The nutrition of expectant mothers was dreadful which all led to increasing rates of death in labour. It didn’t seem to occur to the doctors how external factors impacted the death rate and chalked it up to the ‘danger of child birth’ this only seemed to make matters worse as intervention at this time was not as sophisticated as it is now.

Times started to change in Georgian to Regency Times.

Moving back to nature was starting to produce more normal births and a trend begun. Just as progress was picking up speed, the death of Princess Charlotte after 50 hour of labour, plunge England into mourning probably only ever seen again on that scale when Princess Diana died.

Shops closed for 2 weeks. People from every class wore black arm bands. People looked for a scapegoat. Dr Croft who attended to Princess Charlotte fitted the bill and after weeks of fingers pointed at him, he committed suicide.

Child birth from here on took a much more aggressive tone. Birth was seen as hard and very difficult process. Hygiene and better living did help but death rates were still very high. Activity during pregnancy was frowned upon, many women disappearing from society until after birth.

Victorian Era – A time when women were to be seen and not heard. Where women were seen as fragile frail creatures who were entirely to blame for miscarriage. Citing over exertion as the probable cause. You can imagine what this did for activity levels during pregnancy.

Yuck!! Pregnancy and a Corset!!
Yuck!! Pregnancy and a Corset!!

Pain relief became common place. Even Queen Victoria used chloroform. And the first successful cesarean was carried out in 1882.

Great strides were being made in the medical field during this time but a women’s natural ability to deliver, something she had been doing for thousands of years was wildly underestimated.

It is not until present day that we are now moving back to the idea that a women can deliver without medical intervention or drugs. Birthing centres were first introduced in America during the 1970’s.

Delivery reverting back to standing and squatting positions. Death rate over the last 50 years have plummeted

This marked the beginning of a new wave of women who wanted to give birth the way nature intended. Intervention is only used in emergencies and drugs offered in birthing centres are limited to be gas and air. Birthing pools and hypnotherapy becoming far more popular.

The advise to stay active during pregnancy is now picking up pace, with special classes being programmed and courses to educate fitness professionals increasing in popularity.

Slowly and I mean slowly people are starting to view pregnancy in a new light. Women is seen as a powerful force who is not only looking out for her own health by staying active but also giving her unborn child a great start too.

Still there are a lot of negative views of exercise, particularly something like Crossfit.

I love the photo’s of my friend Rachel Steadman during her pregnancy. The irony between the two different shots.

Accaptable – Holding her daughter overhead.

Unacceptable – A kettelbell Swing

Both of equal weight, it’s probably less awkward in fact to swing the bell.

Why such a view??

Because we have lost sight and forgotten that pregnancy is as old as time.

Looking at the history things only got worse the more we interfered, the less active women were and as cities and villages became crowed and unclean.

I am not suggesting we revert back to ancient times and bang clubs but we could learn a lot from how our ancestors view life, birth and death.

If a women has always done an activity,  carry water buckets on her head or swing a kettlebell why does she have to stop?

Please lets be sensible about how we look at a training pregnant women. I bet she is more in tune with her own body and more clued up about her limitations then you think.

(If you are pregnant and want to continue training I would always advise to seek out some professional guidance first and consult your doctor)

 

Sally Dixey is a Personal Trainer with Crossfit London in Bethnal Green